We’ve seen parental control technology in a lot of different circumstances, with video games and TV providing possibilities for controlling the children’s experience, but the future iteration of the Chevrolet Malibu will put this into one of its weirdest contexts.

A video launched Friday on the Chevrolet YouTube channel presents a new feature called Teen Driver that the General Motors brand will incorporate in the 2016 version of the Malibu. And it is essentially the same thing as TV control system applied to an automobile.

Parents lending their vehicle to their freshly driving licensed children will now be able to control a wide range of options regarding the vehicle’s performance and more when their teens are driving it. After activating a PIN code on the car’s electronic system and linking it with their sixteen years old’s set of keys, the parent is able to set up some parameters regarding the teen’s driving.

For example, they can set a maximum speed limit, which when surpassed will knock off a loud alarm inside the car. The system will also generate a report card accessible by the parent which leaks on the distance driven by the teen, the number of times maximum speed alarms were set up, average speed or the frequency if stability control kicking in.

In addition to this, activating Teen Driver will also lock most of the vehicle’s security features, such as Collision Alert, Traction Control or Parking Assist, so that they cannot be turned off.

“We developed this system so parents could use it as a teaching tool with their kids – they can discuss and reinforce safe driving habits. As a mother of two, I know anything that has the potential of keeping one’s family safer is of great value to parents” said MaryAnn Beebe, safety engineer for GM, who presented the Teen Driver system in the video.

The 2016 Chevrolet Malibu is set to officially debut in April, with it being available to purchase starting with December this year. It remains to be seen whether this system will actually be a breakthrough in providing better safety for teens while driving, or if its use will ultimately be the one of a joke between two partners sharing the same car.

Image Source: Carscoops